Culture & Curious Habits / Indonesia / Netherlands

[Mutual Heritage] Family heirloom recipes from Dutch-Indies era to today’s Indonesia : Domino koekjes!

Several days ago, my mother showed me a box filled with baking recipes from her mother. My grandmother was born in the 1920s so in terms of baking, she had her fair share of baking in the Dutch Indies era. These recipes were typed on a good old fashioned typewriter with plenty of handwritten notes here and there as you can see in the photo. These recipes includes biscuits I am familiar with like  Kattetongen, Schuimpjes and Roomhoorns to some that really sounds appetizing like Bloeder Peujeum (FTW!), Domino koekjes and Melk Bangket, to some that I need to really think hard about like P.F. P. R. Snijtaart, Tipsy cake and Up&Down.

IMG_20150703_094618

Pages of typewritten recipes complete with handwritten notes.

While many of these recipes uses margarin (mentega) some suggests of use ‘roomboter’ or butter. Ask any Indonesian who is familiar with baking or loves eating koekjes, they would know the legendary Wijsman butter. H.J. Wijsman en Zonen has produced the canned butter since 1846. My guess is that they have been producing the butter exact same way until today. It is interesting to learn that this particular butter was especially made to ‘endure’ tropical climate.  On their webpage they say that it is a “Canned butter for problem-free use in tropical countries.” It is said that the first butter was exported to Indonesia in 1900, I suppose that was when they figure out a recipe for butter that could stand ‘a bit’ of heat. Back then, they transport these butter in a wooden barrels and a special cooling system: ice cubes.

An advertisment on Sumatra Post - Source

An advertisment on Sumatra Post – Source

EH0D51 Preserved Dutch Buuter tin, Provision Merchant, HJ Wijsman & Zonen, Amsterdam, foto1

Preserved Dutch Butter tin, Provision Merchant, HJ Wijsman & Zonen, Amsterdam

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Wijsman boter tin today.

The other special ingredient is ‘Edammer’ or Edam cheese. Traditionally the cheese was made at a harbour town called Edam since the 12th Century. If you are familiar with this cheese, you’d recognise the red candle (paraffin) like wrappings on these balls of cheese. It was used for the first time on the 14th Century and the red coloured Edammer was used to mark the cheese that would be exported overseas. The paraffin wrapping enables the cheese to last a long overseas journeys.

Edam cheese looks like it could be a cannon ball - Source

Edam cheese looks like it could be a cannon ball – Source

There are also ingredient that gives such a strong character and very important in the South/Southeast Asian region: sugar and spices.

So yes, enough with history lesson and more of the recipe sharing as written on my Grandmother’s pages. I would like to share with you a recipe for koekjes that is rarely made these days : Domino Koekjes !

domino-2

Domino Koekjes –Source

Domino koekjes

Domino koekjes recipe, old Indonesian spelling (Bahasa Indonesia ejaan lama)

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4 thoughts on “[Mutual Heritage] Family heirloom recipes from Dutch-Indies era to today’s Indonesia : Domino koekjes!

  1. Ya ampun aku baru sadar. Mbak Ayas tinggal di Belanda juga? Anyway aku di Indonesia tinggal sama oma yang heavily induced by Netherlands culture, tapi gak pernah nemu kue domino kayak gini. Salam kenal!

    • hihi nama panggilanku Aya, Crys. Nyaru memang ya nama blog ku. Iya kue domino ini kayaknya agak langka, mungkin karena ribet bikinnya :)), aku paling lihat dulu di toko kue Sumber Hidangan di Bandung. Aku tinggal setengah di Belanda dan Bandung, tergantung kerjaan membawaku kemana.

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